Rachelle Visit 1: A 32-year-old woman with ulcerative colitis who wants to start a family

Title:

Rachelle Visit 1: A 32-year-old woman with ulcerative colitis who wants to start a family

Topic: Gastroenterology
Relevant Terms: Ulcerative Colitis
Primary Audience: Primary Care Practitioners; Gastroenterologists; Physician Assistants; Nurse Practitioners
Launch Date: 13-Jun-12
Credits: 0.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit
Expiration Date: The accreditation for this activity has expired.
Curriculum Name: Persistence, Adherence, and Compliance Education in Ulcerative Colitis

Learning Objectives

After completing this activity, the participant will demonstrate the ability to:

  1. Identify the current extent of noncompliance, nonadherence, and poor treatment persistence among patients with ulcerative colitis and evaluate compliance/adherence/persistence models.
  2. Apply an appropriate adherence/persistence message to patients with ulcerative colitis that highlights the benefits of maintaining treatment and the risks of stopping.
  3. Integrate time-saving methods that educate patients with ulcerative colitis and facilitate treatment, adherence and persistence.

    Faculty

    Steven Brant, MD (Course Director)
    Associate Professor of Medicine
    Director, Meyerhoff Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center
    Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
    Baltimore, Maryland
    Linda Lee, MD (Course Director)
    Associate Professor of Medicine
    Director, Johns Hopkins Integrative Medicine and Digestive Center
    Clinical Director, Divisions of Gastroenterology & Hepatology
    Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
    Baltimore, Maryland
    Sharon Dudley-Brown, PhD, FNP-BC
    Co-Director, Gastroenterology & Hepatology Nurse Practitioner Fellowship Program
    Assistant Professor
    Schools of Medicine & Nursing
    Johns Hopkins University
    Baltimore, Maryland
    Presented by the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.


    Supported by an educational grant from Shire Pharmaceuticals.

    Accreditation Statements
    The Johns Hopkins University of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    Credit Designation
    The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation on the activity.
     
    Each virtual patient carries a maximum of 0.5 credits AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™.
     
    Length of activity: 30 minutes
     
    Internet CME Policy
    The Office of Continuing Medical Education (OCME) at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine is committed to protecting the privacy of its members and customers. Johns Hopkins maintains its Internet sites as an information resource and service for physicians, other health professionals and the public. Continuing Medical Education at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine will keep your personal and credit information confidential when you participate in a CME Internet-based program. Your information will never be given to anyone outside these institutions. CME collects only the information necessary to provide you with the service you request.

    Statement of Responsibility
    The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine takes responsibility for the content, quality and scientific integrity of this CME activity. 

     
    Intended Audience: This activity is intended for gastroenterologists, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and other treating patients with mild to moderate ulcerative colitis
     
    There are no prerequisites to participate.

    Learners can go to www.PACEUC.org to view a Webcast of the live symposium and review the introduction of the virtual patients.

    Planner/Faculty Disclosure
    As a provider approved by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), it is the policy of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Office of Continuing Medical Education (OCME) and the Institute for Johns Hopkins Nursing to require the disclosure of the existence of financial relationships with industry form any individual in a position to control the content of a CME activity sponsored by OCME. Members of the Planning Committee are required to disclose all relationships, regardless of their relevance to the content of the activity. Faculty members are required to disclose only those relationships that are relevant to their specific presentations. The faculty reported the following:
     
    PLANNER DISCLOSURE:
    Name
    Relationship
    Steven Brant, MD                                           
    Grant/Research Support: Abbott, Centocor, Salix Pharmaceuticals, and Shire Pharmaceuticals
     
    No other planners have indicated that they have any financial interests or relationships with a commercial entity.

    FACULTY DISCLOSURE:
    Faculty Name
    Relationship
    Steven Brant, MD
    Grant/Research Support: Abbott, Centocor, Salix Pharmaceuticals, and Shire Pharmaceuticals
    Sharon Dudley-Brown, PhD, FNP-BC             
    Consultant/Advisor: Salix Pharmaceuticals and Shire Pharmaceuticals
     
    No other faculty members have indicated that they have any financial interests or relationships with a commercial entity whose products or services are relevant to the content of their presentation(s).
     
    OFF LABEL LANGUAGE:
    The authors have indicated that there will be no reference to unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products in the presentation.

    Statement of Need:
    We conducted focused interviews and individual discussions with five eminent educator-clinicians who specialize in the treatment of ulcerative colitis and in health communications. Clinicians working with UC patients need an educational program to facilitate changes in attitudes and practice as it applies to improving their patient's persistence, adherence and compliance to adherence to UC therapy.
     
    A survey of physicians was conducted to gain a more in-depth understanding of their educational need for improving their patients' persistence, adherence and compliance to UC therapy. Responses revealed that more than half of the clinicians believed that 25%-50% of their patients being treated for UC were nonadherent and non-persistent with treatment prescribed and that this sometimes/often resulted in treatment failure. However, more than half of the clinicians reported that they did not "always" discuss treatment adherence and persistence with their UC patients. These clinicians (82%) indicated that they would attend an educational activity that focused on improving treatment persistence and adherence among their patients with mild to moderate UC.
     
    An in-depth review of the medical literature including national and regional measures, on ulcerative colitis and persistence, adherence, and compliance to therapy reveals that there is a broad range of medical therapies available for managing UC. Research reports that patients who are symptomatic and have more severe UC tend to adhere to their medication regimens. However, adherence/persistence rates of outpatients with quiescent UC to maintenance therapy are poor. Adherence and persistence to treatment among patients with UC is complex and a challenge for clinicians, with factors varying among patients and changing over time. However, there are strategies and tools that the clinician can use to improve the UC patients' adherence and persistence to treatment.
     
    DISCLAMER
    The opinions and recommendations expressed by faculty and other experts whose input is included in this program are their own. Use of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine name implies review of educational format design and approach. Please review the complete prescribing information of specific drugs or combination of drugs, including indications, contraindications, warnings and adverse effects before administering pharmacologic therapy to patients.
     
    Method of Participation
    There are no fees for participating in this CME activity. To receive credit, participants must (1) read the learning objectives and disclosure statements, (2) complete the educational activity, and (3) complete the posttest and activity evaluation form, including the certificate information section.
     
    To obtain a certificate, participants must receive a score of 70% or better on the posttest. The posttest can be accessed at the end of the activity. Please e-mail any questions to info@paceuc.org.

    To participate in additional CME activities presented by the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Continuing Medical Education Office, please visit: www.hopkinscme.edu 

    Confidentiality Disclaimer for CME Conference Attendees
    I certify that I am participating in this Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine activity for CME-accredited training and/or educational purposes.
     
    I understand that while I am participating in this capacity, I may be exposed to "protected health information," as that term is defined and used in Johns Hopkins policies and in the federal HIPAA privacy regulations (the "Privacy Regulations").  Protected health information is information about a person's health or treatment that identifies the person.  I also understand that while I am participating in this capacity I will be treated as a temporary member of Johns Hopkins for purposes of the Privacy Regulations only.
     
    I pledge and agree to use and disclose any of this protected health information only for the training and/or educational purposes of my visit and to keep the information confidential.  
     
    I understand that I may direct to the Johns Hopkins Privacy Officer any questions I have about my obligations under this Confidentiality Pledge or under any of the Hopkins policies and procedures and applicable laws and regulations related to confidentiality.  The contact information is:  Johns Hopkins Privacy Officer, telephone: 410-735-6509, e-mail: HIPAA@jhmi.edu.
     
    "The Office of Continuing Medical Education at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, as sponsor of this activity, has relayed information with the CME attendees/participants and certifies that the visitor is here for training, education and/or observation purposes only."
     
     
    Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
    Office of Continuing Medical Education
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    Medium
    The Internet was selected as the instructional format to accommodate the learning preferences of a significant portion of the target audience.

    Hardware and Software Requirements
    Pentium 800 processor or greater, Windows 98/NT/2000/XP/7 or Mac OS 9/X, Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.5 or later, 56K or better modem, Windows Media Player 9.0 or later, 128 MB of RAM, sound card and speakers, Adobe Acrobat Reader, storage, Internet connectivity, and minimum connection speed. Monitor settings: High color at 800 x 600 pixels
     
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